Do You Have Cravings For Certain Foods?

It’s probably fair to say that each of us will have a craving for a food at some time. Pregnant women are well renowned for having strange food cravings. It’s easy to remedy if you have a food craving, after all, you can just go  out and purchase that food and eat it, however there can be another side to food cravings, and that is that you may even be craving certain foods and not be aware of it. How can that happen?  

Have a look at what you are eating each day. Is there a food that you have to have? We all know that coffee is addictive, and alcohol and tea and good old chocolate. How about if you just have to have potato chips regularly? If you just can’t walk out of the supermarket without the chippies in your trolly, without  your recognising it, you have a craving! It is subtle and not as glaringly obvious as chocolate or coffee, but there it is. How about when you go to the supermarket, armed with a shopping list, yet you can’t walk past certain foods without popping them into your trolly. Not just naughty foods, but fruit or veggies or meats. When you see something you think how nice that looks. Impulse buying or cravings?  Craving wins!  We see the foods, be it good for  us or not, and get a sense that we need that food. There could be a very good nutritional reason behind that impulsive buying. There could also be emotional reasons.

Lets look at some of the cravings and what they mean from a nutritional perspective:

The following foods can be indicative of a deficiency, not for everyone nor is it necessary the only mineral or vitamin that could be deficient, so please use this as a general guide only. If you would like to check out what is causing your cravings, come in and see Molly.

[table class=”table table-condensed” width=”80%”]

Food, Deficiency
Chocolate, magnesium  
Soft drinks,  calcium
Lollies or sweets,  chromium / tryptophan
Salty foods incl. chips,  chloride and essential fatty acids
Red meat, iron
Bread  & Toast, nitrogen
Pasta, chromium
Cheese, calcium and essential fatty acids
Acidic foods,  magnesium
Coffee & Tea,  iron /  sulphur / sodium chloride 
Alcohol & Drugs,  calcium / potassium / glutamine
Spicy foods, zinc
Ice (frozen),  iron / folic acid / B6 or B12


The Seeds Have It!

Often not your first thought for a snack, but a handful of seeds can give you a mighty boost of energy as they are packed full of nutrients and as a bonus they are really delicious.

Take sunflower seeds for example. Sunflower seeds contain high levels of copper, vitamin B1, B3, B6, manganese, magnesium, selenium, phosphorus, and folate, and are an excellent source of vitamin E. In just a quarter cup of sunflower seeds you get between 80%- 90% of your daily requirement of vitamin E, which is the body’s primary fat-soluble antioxidant.

Sunflower seeds contain phytosterols which are naturally occurring compounds that have an ability to help lower blood cholesterol levels.

Sunflower seeds have anti-inflammatory properties, help to calm your nerves, aid in the detox process of your body, and have a degree of protection against cancer because of the high levels of selenium. A quarter cup of these seeds give you around 34% of your daily requirements of selenium.

All in all, this is a seed to have on hand at all times. As usual, buy organic.

Oregano Paste

Here is a healthy winter drizzle!

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is a really prized herb that I have growing in my garden. It is very easy to grow and is a perennial, so you have access to it all year. Great on pizza and in any italian dishes. It has  powerful anti-bacterial, anti-fungal  and anti-parasitic properties and  it is good for digestion as well. It contains many nutrients; iron, magnesium, calcium,vitamin E, vitamin C and some of the vitamin B group.

Oregano is a very strong flavoured herb, and for a good reason, you don’t need much of it to get good flavour and a great many health benefits. Pick a couple of leaves and add to a cup of herb tea to help fight off those head colds during winter.

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Awesome Almonds

The Health Benefits of Almonds:

Almonds are one of our earliest cultivated foods, and are thought to have originated in central Asia. Almonds are delicious and the health benefits are numerous.

A real powerhouse snack, in a 1/4 cup of almonds there is around 15% of the RDA for protein, around 7grams. This is a food to be taken with you on any outdoor activity, especially if going on a long walk or hiking.

Almonds can play an important part in many processes in the human body,

Being one of our most alkaline nuts, almonds can help to stabilise the acid alkaline balance in our body. Read More

Lemons – the magic fruit

The ever humble lemon. They are cheap to buy, and always available. We use them extensively with food or as a garnishing for our food. We use lemons for cooking in cakes, in chicken dishes and with fish of course. We can make lemonade or have it in hot water, or with tea or herbal teas. Probably something we don’t think very often about is how good a lemon is for us.  The juice, the peel, the aromatic oils from the skin. All having amazing health properties. There are a great many health benefits of lemon, and this knowledge has been known for centuries. Information has been passed down through generations, of the wonderful  antibacterial and antiviral properties that lemons possess. Lemons contain citric acid, calcium, magnesium, vitamin c, vitamin A, bioflavonoids, pectin and limonene, constituents that help to promote good health. Always dilute lemon juice, as full strength, it can damage the enamel of the teeth.

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