There’s your protein shake!

Did you know that if you mix chickpeas and rice milk together you have a complete protein? No more having to resort to processed protein powders with their potential for serious damage to your liver and kidneys.

Protein shake chickpeas rice milk

Thanks to one of those quirky bits of science, if you mix the humble chickpea with rice you get a resulting mixture that is a complete protein. It might be a bit hard to drink like that but by substituting rice milk we get a liquid result that can rightly be called a “protein shake”. Admittedly it’s not very tasty as is so Molly brings it to life with the addition of other goodies like bananas, frozen berries, yoghurt etc.

What is a complete protein? From Wikipedia :

complete protein (or whole protein) is a source of protein that contains an adequate proportion of all nine of the essential amino acids necessary for the dietary needs of humans. 

You can find more information on chickpeas in Molly’s earlier post, “Chickpeas Champion of Champions“.

Try Molly’s Protein Shake, I think you will be pleasantly surprised, I was.

Molly's Protein Shake


  • 100g chickpeas. (We use a 400g can between the two of us. Yes, a 400g can will only yield about 200g of chickpeas.)
  • 300ml rice milk
  • 1 banana
  • 1/2 cup frozen berries
  • 1 heaped teaspoon LSA mix
  • 1 heaped teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 1 heaped teaspoon flax seed meal
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon yoghurt


  • Place all ingredients in a blender, mix, pour into a glass and drink. We get good results just using a stick blender with the ingredients in a jug.

All measurements are per person.
The only required ingredients are the chickpeas and the rice milk, all the other ingredients can be varied in both content and quantity as you like. Experiment to get your own favourite mix.
LSA mix is ground linseeds, sunflower kernels and almonds. Readily available at supermarkets and health food shops.
We have suggested canned chickpeas as being a readily available source but you could of course prepare your own chickpeas from raw in bulk and freeze individual portions.

Do You Have Cravings For Certain Foods?

It’s probably fair to say that each of us will have a craving for a food at some time. Pregnant women are well renowned for having strange food cravings. It’s easy to remedy if you have a food craving, after all, you can just go  out and purchase that food and eat it, however there can be another side to food cravings, and that is that you may even be craving certain foods and not be aware of it. How can that happen?  

Have a look at what you are eating each day. Is there a food that you have to have? We all know that coffee is addictive, and alcohol and tea and good old chocolate. How about if you just have to have potato chips regularly? If you just can’t walk out of the supermarket without the chippies in your trolly, without  your recognising it, you have a craving! It is subtle and not as glaringly obvious as chocolate or coffee, but there it is. How about when you go to the supermarket, armed with a shopping list, yet you can’t walk past certain foods without popping them into your trolly. Not just naughty foods, but fruit or veggies or meats. When you see something you think how nice that looks. Impulse buying or cravings?  Craving wins!  We see the foods, be it good for  us or not, and get a sense that we need that food. There could be a very good nutritional reason behind that impulsive buying. There could also be emotional reasons.

Lets look at some of the cravings and what they mean from a nutritional perspective:

The following foods can be indicative of a deficiency, not for everyone nor is it necessary the only mineral or vitamin that could be deficient, so please use this as a general guide only. If you would like to check out what is causing your cravings, come in and see Molly.

[table class=”table table-condensed” width=”80%”]

Food, Deficiency
Chocolate, magnesium  
Soft drinks,  calcium
Lollies or sweets,  chromium / tryptophan
Salty foods incl. chips,  chloride and essential fatty acids
Red meat, iron
Bread  & Toast, nitrogen
Pasta, chromium
Cheese, calcium and essential fatty acids
Acidic foods,  magnesium
Coffee & Tea,  iron /  sulphur / sodium chloride 
Alcohol & Drugs,  calcium / potassium / glutamine
Spicy foods, zinc
Ice (frozen),  iron / folic acid / B6 or B12


Comfy carbs

Isn’t it interesting that when you have some yummy refined carbs such as breads, cakes, pasta, and chocolate as a treat, the next day you seem to crave them. Interestingly it can be almost the exact hour that you had your carb hit the day before. Sometimes after you eat a meal that has a high loading of carbs, like a pasta meal or rice, you can somehow be wanting to eat again after an hour or so, despite how much you have just eaten.

Carbs are an essential food and very important to add to our diet, but the down side is that refined carbs in particular are addictive, and lets look at why.

When you eat your carbs, as with all foods, a cascade of chemicals are released. With refined carbs, the chemicals travel from the stomach to the brain where we produce dopamine. This is a hormone and neurotransmitter that affects the pleasure and reward centre of our brain. Our pleasure response is activated, and we all like that feeling. A lot! We link that feeling with the food we are eating, and we want more of it, and more, and more. Hence the addictions to chocolate and cakes etc.

When you eat your carbs with a meal, do put a limit on the quantity, making your vegetables and proteins the king and queen of your meal. Let the carbs be the servants – giving you energy but not ruling how your body functions. Always combine carbs with fats. This helps to slow sugar absorption and control your weight and stabilise your blood sugars.

How much to have at a meal:

Carb = fist

Protein = palm

Fats = little finger

Veges – greens = grab all you can hold

Veges – starchy = fist

Carrots, more than meets the eye

Carrots are one of our staple vegetables, just like our potato, and would probably be used in cooking in every household at least a few times a week. Carrots can be grown all year round in temperate climates, so this is a food that is quite synergistic with our body at any time of the year. They belong to the umbelliferae family and are related to parsnips, fennel, caraway, parsley, anise, dill and cumin.

Carrots are a very nutritious food, and contain many vitamins and minerals, and of course are a great source of fibre. The carrot is most well known for the high levels of beta-carotene that it has, and as the old wives tale goes, they help you to see in the dark! And there is some truth to that old tale. There are many wonderful health benefits in our common carrot, and really need to be in your diet on a daily basis. Read More

The Seeds Have It!

Often not your first thought for a snack, but a handful of seeds can give you a mighty boost of energy as they are packed full of nutrients and as a bonus they are really delicious.

Take sunflower seeds for example. Sunflower seeds contain high levels of copper, vitamin B1, B3, B6, manganese, magnesium, selenium, phosphorus, and folate, and are an excellent source of vitamin E. In just a quarter cup of sunflower seeds you get between 80%- 90% of your daily requirement of vitamin E, which is the body’s primary fat-soluble antioxidant.

Sunflower seeds contain phytosterols which are naturally occurring compounds that have an ability to help lower blood cholesterol levels.

Sunflower seeds have anti-inflammatory properties, help to calm your nerves, aid in the detox process of your body, and have a degree of protection against cancer because of the high levels of selenium. A quarter cup of these seeds give you around 34% of your daily requirements of selenium.

All in all, this is a seed to have on hand at all times. As usual, buy organic.

Oregano Paste

Here is a healthy winter drizzle!

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is a really prized herb that I have growing in my garden. It is very easy to grow and is a perennial, so you have access to it all year. Great on pizza and in any italian dishes. It has  powerful anti-bacterial, anti-fungal  and anti-parasitic properties and  it is good for digestion as well. It contains many nutrients; iron, magnesium, calcium,vitamin E, vitamin C and some of the vitamin B group.

Oregano is a very strong flavoured herb, and for a good reason, you don’t need much of it to get good flavour and a great many health benefits. Pick a couple of leaves and add to a cup of herb tea to help fight off those head colds during winter.

Read More

Appetising avocados

Avocado is a very nutritious and thankfully common food in most households today. Growing up in country Australia, I hadn’t even seen an avocado up until about thirty years ago. Avocado was not a common food for us. That’s not to say it wasn’t around, just that it wasn’t a typical food in our diet, which was typical of the average ‘Aussie’ at that time. It has certainly become a more popular addition on the grocery list over the last twenty years.

There are over 80 varieties of avocado these days, and the Hass is probably the best known variety. It was discovered in 1935 by Rudolph Hass. A single fully matured tree can produce as many as 500 avocados. That’s impressive! It is thought that the avocado first came from Mexico around 5,000 BC. There have been seeds of the avocado found buried with Incan mummies that date back to 750BC. Read More

Molly’s 1 minute cake

A cake in 1 minute? 


Feel like a piece of cake, but don’t have the time to make one?  Here is a recipe that can cure that time problem, and give you a yummy cake to eat.

This little cake is cooked in a microwave.!  I know, a microwave! I don’t often use a microwave, more to heat plates, or defrost the dogs meat. Well now, for the purpose of my cake cravings,  I surrender to technology and the power of the microwave!

 M Read More

If You Are Serious About Your Health, You Need to Know What You Are Eating!

Doughnuts4075787XSmallProcessed food! It’s not always what you think it is — often it is so much more! Much, much more — in fact what you are consuming may be completely artificially flavoured, coloured and textured, and have many different chemicals added to it to make it look good, smell good, taste good, feel good in your mouth, and last but not least, to lengthen the life of the product, in fact, to allow it to remain ’on the shelf’ for many months. Natural? Not likely!

Preserving foods is not a new process. For thousands of years foods have been salted, pickled and dried with the most common additive being salt. If only it was still that simple! Read More

Winter tea & chicken soup

Tis the season, to feel ‘fluish’ isn’t it?

It is very hard to avoid getting a good old cold now we are in the middle of winter, and where ever you go you can hear the familiar song of winter – coughing and sneezing.

Here are two simple recipes to keep you ‘soldiering on’ naturally. Read More